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Gloria Umanah, the visionary behind Hope Booth, uses her own lived experiences to passionately fight for those who feel invisible. In this episode, Gloria generously shares her story with the Be the Bridge community and the story behind Hope Booth. She and Latasha connect over their Yoruba names and over being Black women who lead non profits. They discuss mental health, the power of making someone feel seen and that they belong, and making hope and help accessible to all.

Gloria’s story, words, and work will empower listeners to choose to keep living, to see hope all around, and to see themselves as worthy of being cared for. This conversation is full of reminders that God is at work and that no one is alone. The episode ends with Gloria sharing a powerful spoken word piece you do not want to miss.

*(We do want to offer a listener warning that suicide is mentioned in this episode.)

Join in the conversation on our social media pages on Facebook and Instagram and LinkedIn to let us know your thoughts on this episode! 

Host & Executive Producer – Latasha Morrison
Senior Producer – Lauren C. Brown
Producer, Editor, & Music – Travon Potts with Integrated Entertainment Studios
Assistant Producer & Transcriber – Sarah Connatser

Quotes:
“My scars are roadmaps to redemption for other people.” -Gloria Umanah

“There’s a way of showing people their dignity and their worth when you acknowledge their existence.” -Latasha Morrison

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Resources Mentioned:
Until All Are Seen documentary by Hope Booth
Equal Justice Initiative Legacy Sites
“See Me” spoken word video by Gloria Umanah

Connect with Gloria Umanah:
Her Website
Instagram
Facebook

Connect with Hope Booth:
Website
Facebook
Instagram

Connect with Be the Bridge:
Our Website
Facebook
Instagram
Threads
Twitter

Connect with Latasha Morrison:
Facebook
Instagram
Threads
Twitter


Not all views expressed in this interview reflect the values and beliefs of Latasha Morrison or the Be the Bridge organization.

Narrator
You are listening to the Be of Bridge Podcast with Latasha Morrison.

Latasha Morrison
[intro] How are you guys doing today? It’s exciting!

Narrator
Each week, Be the Bridge Podcast tackles subjects related to race and culture with the goal of bringing understanding.

Latasha Morrison
[intro] …but I’m gonna do it in the spirit of love.

Narrator
We believe understanding can move us toward racial healing, racial equity, and racial unity. Latasha Morrison is the founder of Be the Bridge, which is an organization responding to racial brokenness and systemic injustice in our world. This podcast is an extension of our vision to make sure people are no longer conditioned by a racialized society but grounded in truth. If you have not hit the subscribe button, please do so now. Without further ado, let’s begin today’s podcast. Oh, and stick around for some important information at the end.

Latasha Morrison
Be the Bridge community, I have another exciting guest to bring you. She is a local. Believe me. I am not choosing all these people from Atlanta. It’s just that Atlanta is producing some amazing creatives and leaders out here. So I have another amazing Atlanta native here, Gloria Umanah, who is here and who is going to really talk to us about some of the beautiful work that she’s doing. This is the thing. We were talking as we got on the call. We were saying that we live in Atlanta. And we’ve never met in person. We’re both busy, y’all. We’re trying to, out here trying to impact the world with what the Lord has given us to do. But we haven’t met yet. But this is an opportunity now. But I have heard of her work. And she’s heard of Be the Bridge, and she understands this community. And I think this is an important conversation that we need to have, especially in light of everything that’s happening just over the last few years and just even this week. It’s been an intense week with a lot of shootings and just the intensity of the society is causing a lot of trauma for a lot of people.

Latasha Morrison
And so, Gloria is a first generation Nigerian American born here in Atlanta. Okay, you see, right? Okay, we’re gonna talk about that in a minute. (laughter) She’s lived below the poverty line for the majority of her childhood. She lived in over 10 different motel rooms along with her family, her four sisters, and her immigrant mother over the span of six years. Through such a challenging upbringing, Gloria overcame homelessness, fatherlessness, depression, and suicide. After nearly losing her life to suicide at the age of 16 after a year of experiencing intense bullying in the midst her living situation, Gloria became passionate about fighting for those who feel invisible and cultivating desire for greater purpose beyond circumstances with individuals. Gloria has partnered with organizations and ministries all over the world telling her beautiful and powerful stories of hope and redemption. And we know that is what Be the Bridge is all about. She has shared her story to over 3 million individuals worldwide online and offline. In 2021 she debuted her most recent nonprofit initiative called Hope Booth. And this is a global nonprofit on mission to pioneer a movement where no one feels unseen by making hope and the help assessable to all. Gloria has intentionally assembled a crew of minorities from across the country to pioneer this movement with her. The team consists of BIPOC people under the age of 30 with personal stories that tethered them to the mission and the heartbeat of Hope Booth. So join me in welcoming Gloria to the Be the Bridge Podcast. Yay! We need some clapping. We need some clapping music because we are, I love to see young people doing it. You know? A lot of us, a lot of people who are listening, even myself, like we started on this leadership journey really young. And that’s why I’m looking at like just what is gonna happen with Hope Booth and Gloria. Like it’s tough now, being a leader, I know it is. But God has it. And I know this work is really hard as a Black woman leading a nonprofit without the, what you would say the, sometimes the money. Let’s be honest, the seed money that it takes.

Latasha Morrison
I think about, you know, with Be the Bridge, I started Be the Bridge with zero seed money. Lots of faith, lots of support, lots of people, but like, you know, no one gave me $100,000 or you know to start this. And so, I know that story. But it’s amazing what God will do. And I don’t know why it’s like that for some people and other people is like they have money coming out their ears. You know? But I am glad that you are here. I’m glad that you’re here in Atlanta. And I look forward to meeting you in person. And I’m so excited to highlight your story, to highlight your organization on the Be the Bridge Podcast so that our listeners can also get behind the work that you’re doing. Could you tell me a little bit about who Gloria is. I love the fact that you talked about your Nigerian heritage. You know, as an African American, I just found out that, of course, being from North Carolina, I knew that my heritage just pointed back to West Africa, Nigeria, but it also pointed back to, I was able to narrow it down, I took an African ancestry test, and it went back to Yoruba. And so not only do I have a place, but I also have what you would call a tribe, a clan to identify with. So which is important for me. And I know a lot of people might be like, “I don’t know what that means or understand.” I know exactly what it means. (laughter) And, you know, and, you know, and all those things. So I am excited. And that’s why even I wanted to make sure I said your name right. Because names mean something in the Nigerian culture. Like it identifies your space and your culture and so many things. And so that’s important. So tell us a little bit about how you came to be, just a little bit about your story. I mentioned a few things in here. But and you were, yeah, I want to know, when did you come to Atlanta? Were you born here? I think it said you were born here. Right?

Gloria Umanah
Yeah. Okay. Great questions. First of all, thank you so much for having me. I’m so honored to get to be on here and get to just meet you for the first time. Truly, I think this is incredible. The work you’re doing is really beautiful. And something I admire. Secondly, welcome to the Yoruba Tribe. That’s what we are as well on this side. It is the best. We talked about that.

Latasha Morrison
From the last name I thought it was. I’m learning, I’m learning.

Gloria Umanah
It’s the best. Thirdly, we’ll have to give you a Yoruba first name. So I’ll be thinking about it. Because we got to get you one.

Latasha Morrison
Okay. I want to see what you come up with. Because someone gave me one. But I want to see if you come up with something else.

Gloria Umanah
Not someone else giving you! Are they Yoruba?

Latasha Morrison
The week I found out, I was a part of Praxis.

Gloria Umanah
Okay.

Latasha Morrison
And there were two people that were from Nigeria that was a part of Praxis. And so they gave me a name. You want me to tell you what it is?

Gloria Umanah
Yes, yes!

Latasha Morrison
I want you to see if it resonates with you.

Gloria Umanah
Okay.

Latasha Morrison
And correct me if I say it wrong, you know, you guys, I’m still learning. It takes practice. So, Oluwakemi.

Gloria Umanah
Oh, that fits you!

Latasha Morrison
It fits me, right?

Gloria Umanah
I was actually, I was gonna ask you if it was going to start with Oluwa. Because they all do. (laughter) They all do except mine. Actually.

Latasha Morrison
Oh really?

Gloria Umanah
So my Nigerian first name is Fiyinfoluwa, which means “all glory to God.”

Latasha Morrison
Look at that!

Gloria Umanah
So it’s really just in tandem with my middle name, which is Gloria.

Latasha Morrison
Exactly.

Gloria Umanah
Yeah, but I love that.

Latasha Morrison
Say it again. Say it again, Gloria.

Gloria Umanah
Fiyinfoluwa.

Latasha Morrison
Oh, my goodness. And that’s what I’m talking about. That’s why names are so important.

Gloria Umanah
Truly.

Latasha Morrison
And we can’t let people take names, you know, from us. And I think mine means joy, or something like that. Yeah, something about God’s joy or something like that. So yeah, I’m learning. I’m learning.

Gloria Umanah
I love that. That’s beautiful. There’s so much to learn. I’ll have to take you to get some Nigerian food.

Latasha Morrison
But I don’t have a middle name yet. I don’t have a middle name. So you got to work on that one.

Gloria Umanah
Your middle name’s Latasha. (laughter)

Latasha Morrison
Okay, okay, okay. I’ll have to be Oluwakemi Latasha.

Gloria Umanah
There it is. Oluwakemi Latasha Morrison.

Latasha Morrison
Look at me trying to get all the Nigerian names. (laughter)

Gloria Umanah
Amazing. Oh, my goodness. Yeah, names are very pivotal as far as our identity and who we are in Nigeria, which is, I think it’s so beautiful. But growing up here in America, I didn’t realize the beauty of being Nigerian. When you go to a school that’s predominantly white, and everyone looks at you and says “African booty scratcher” and makes all of these jokes about being African, you are only left to resent who you are. And so for so long, I found no beauty in who I was, no beauty in my identity, no beauty in my heritage. And it’s so funny, because 27 years later, I see the way Nigerian culture is so celebrated by the same people who bullied me when I was in middle and high school. I see how they are now rocking our music, they’re now rocking our food, they’re now traveling to our country. And so I think that’s one thing, when you are developing and understanding your identity. And I think even like for kids, especially, helping them find the beauty of who they are in the fullness of who they are, is so key and important. Because I wish I knew then. So I could have schooled some of the people who were bullying me about how beautiful Nigeria is, about how beautiful it is to be black in America. But yeah, I mean, I think that’s just the dichotomy of living in a world that is not always accepting of who you are. And I think that’s almost always going to be the case. But I think the beautiful part is choosing to see the beauty in who you are, regardless if others see it or not. And so for me, I was conceived in Nigeria, but I was born here in America. So I like to tell people, I have dual citizenship, even though I do not at all. I have no dual citizenship at all. So when my parents came to the States, it was really actually just my mom. My mom met my stepdad when I was in about the second grade. And so growing up, I didn’t realize that my stepdad was actually my stepdad. I thought that that was my biological father the entire time. Because he was honestly incredible and great and so welcoming of our family, and welcoming of me; he treated me just as his own. But something that I began to notice very quickly on in the Nigerian culture, and I think most people would probably agree, is that there’s a level of intensity to everything about us and who we are and what we do. And so that intensity looks a little bit like striving for excellence in every capacity. So any Nigerian you know, you will probably hear them say, “My parent’s dream for me is to become a doctor, a lawyer, an engineer,” anything outside of that framework is considered a failure, in essence. And I remember growing up, like, knowing this truth, but also knowing like, I’m very creative of a person, and like, that’s not really me. But we’ll figure that out when I get older, and I have to cross that path. So my parents left their corporate careers in law and in medicine, and decided to enter into ministry full time. And this is when we saw a lot of the financial crisis in our family kind of take over. They went from very stable, high earning careers to very, very little. Like, I watched an episode where Oprah was interviewing Viola Davis. And Oprah’s so funny, she says, “Viola, you know, I was poor, but you, you were poor.” We were po. Like as poor as it gets. And I think what I translated in that timeframe, I mean, I was super young, what I translated was following God means losing everything. Following God means being poor. And I didn’t understand why I would choose to follow a God would leave me out dry. Why would I choose to follow a God who doesn’t provide for me? Because that’s what I saw. That is what it looked like. But what was so conflicting to me is while we have way less than we ever had, I saw my parents with way more joy than they’ve ever had before. And so this was such a confusing thing for me to try to understand and grapple with. And I knew it wasn’t something I could figure out quickly. But it was something I wanted to figure out quickly because going to school being picked up at the bus stop at a hotel was getting difficult. Because people would say the things they would say; they would look at me differently. It was very shame filled experience. It was really difficult. So much so that I remember many years, I would actually walk a mile from the previous bus stop to my hotel, so that people wouldn’t see me getting off the bus at the hotel. And I think you know, as a kid, when you’re going through so much of a financial crisis that your parents can’t fully understand because they’re immigrants themselves. They’re trying to figure everything out. It’s difficult because you don’t want to blame them because you know they’re doing the best they can. But you also can’t seem to find the answers to explain to your friends when you go to these schools that have high earning parents and kids and everyone has what you can’t have, and as a kid, your identity is essentially rooted in what you have. I think that was one of the biggest things for me. And because I had not, I felt like I was not. Because everyone else had so much, Gloria had very little, I felt like I was invisible, I felt like my life didn’t matter. I felt like people didn’t love me, people didn’t care about me, people didn’t want to be acquainted with me. And these were like really difficult things to grapple with. And so this spread into years of bullying, which eventually led into a downward spiral of suicidal thoughts, dealing with anxiety and depression and suicide ideation and never even telling anyone. I never told a single soul. And I think for me, at the time, I don’t think I even understood what mental health was. I didn’t understand like that there was verbiage and wording for this because this was all a lot newer for our society to talk about. But especially in a Nigerian culture, that’s not like something that’s spoken of, it’s as taboo as it gets. And so that leaves us to suffer in silence. And I suffered many years in silence. And I’m just grateful that I made it out alive. I’m only here today because of hope and because of the grace of God. Which is, it’s a miracle, but I know that every day he is redeeming my story before my eyes. And for people who experience what I’ve experienced, my hope and prayer is that they would know that this is not the end of their story, that if it’s not good, then God is not done just yet. There are better days ahead if we just keep choosing to live even as hard as it gets. And so that’s kind of like my whole heartbeat now. And my whole mission is really pioneering this movement where no one goes unseen. We do it in very unique and special ways. But my story is very much tethered to the work that we do and why we do it the way that we do it as well.

Latasha Morrison
Wow. I was looking at, you know, some of your videos and everything. And there was one that stood out to me. There was a young lady, I think it was in your documentary. And there was a young lady that was crying. And she said, “This was so powerful.” And she talked about how her mom had committed suicide. So tell people a little bit about what Hope Booth is. And tell us a little bit about the Hope Booth Tour and all the things and some of the stories that you guys are telling to help make sure that people are seen and known and where people know that they belong. And so this is more than inclusion, because inclusion can be very surfacey. Because I can be included, but I also need to know that I belong. You know, that we belong here. And so tell us a little bit about Hope Booth and what you guys are doing.

Gloria Umanah
Yeah, absolutely. I’ll give you a little bit of backstory that might be helpful. So I was traveling as a spoken word artist to help churches and conferences really tell the story of Jesus in unique ways outside of Christmas and Easter. And as I was doing this, I was leading a collective of creatives as well. And we would travel in groups together to do this. And in 2020, when the entire world shut down, all of our events naturally were canceled. And so I just remember thinking, “Well what are we going to do? Like, do we just kind of, do we pause everything? We don’t know if this is ever going to end. What do we do? What’s next? What does moving forward look like?” And I feel like 2020 was the year of those who mastered the art of the pivot. If you could master the art of pivot, then you survived and sustained even till now. And in that timeframe, I just heard God so clearly said 2020 was our year to pivot from the stage to the streets. What would it look like if we used our creativity to impact people right where they are and meet them where they are?

Latasha Morrison
You froze a little bit. You said you heard God so clearly say and then you froze.

Gloria Umanah
Okay, I’ll repeat it. Yeah. So I heard God so clearly say that 2020 was our a year to pivot from the stage to the streets. What would it look like if we used our creativity to impact people where they are, who may never come to a church again, may never even have access to online church? What does it look like to impact people? And that’s when I heard the statistic that the average person living on the streets goes three to six months without being looked in the eye. And I remember hearing that for the first time and my heart was broken. Because one, I don’t think people know that. But two, what’s most troubling is the fact that we congregate every Sunday at church and we talk about El Roi, the God who sees and yet somehow it is a statistic that people are going three to six months without being looked in the eye because they do not know that they are seen. And I began to think about my own personal story and this reality that invisibility is no respecter of man. It doesn’t matter if you’re living on the streets, if you are a pastor’s kid like I was, or if you are the CEO of a Fortune 500 or you’re dancing on Tik Tok and making incredible content with Ellen DeGeneres. Regardless of who you are, you have the ability to feel invisible, simply because you are a human. And so we just began thinking, “Well, what does it look like to impact this space in general?” We weren’t thinking about mental health when we began, if I’m 100% honest. My story is not what initially came to mind. It was that stat alone that really drove my heart. And our team got together and we said, “Okay, we need to create something that’s going to make hope and help accessible to anyone and everyone. And the reason why we decided to go the way that we went is because I remember, growing up, we would drive around Atlanta, and it was really easy to find a telephone booth because of the light that emitted through it. And I think that’s exactly what hope is, it’s light amidst the darkness. And so that’s why we decided to create the Hope Booth. And essentially what it is, we take old telephone booths, and we’ve remodeled them into these three minute interactive, immersive experiences that spread artistic messages of hope, and then connect users and individuals to local help and support. Because we really believe that most people are not just in need of hope, but they’re also in need of help as well. And I think our biggest thing, really, when we created this was just, “Let’s just try it and see how it works.” We had very little expectation, we had very little hope. We just were like, “Hey, this will be really incredible to create and see how it works.” And we did our debut in October 2021, in London, England. And we purposely chose London because we already knew how people in America would respond to something like the Hope Booth. Because we live here. We’re like, let’s try a country that’s not as warm per se, who may be a little bit more critical and just honest, in pure sincerity. And so we took the Hope Booth there and we were in the middle of filming a promo video, just in the middle of the street, and we took off the veil off of the actual Hope Booth. And in that very moment, that’s when we knew we had something special because the street stood still. People began walking up to us and asking, “What is this?” Phones were taken out, people taking photos, construction workers left their construction to walk over to figure out what was going on, cars stopped at green lights looking over. And we were like, “Oh, okay. We’re on to something.” And it was incredible, because from that moment on, we had so many people experience the Hope Booth and within like 30, 45 seconds of the three minute experience, people were in tears. Because people genuinely want to feel seen, like that is our intrinsic desire for every single human being. We want to know that we are seen, we belong, we matter regardless of our predicament, our circumstance, our background, our socio economical classes, like that is the heartbeat that everyone in humanity carries. And so, it was amazing to see that happen at our debut. And in that moment, we had so many people from all over the world say, “Hey, can you guys bring the Hope Booth to Nigeria?” “Could you bring the Hope Booth to Kentucky?” “Could you bring the Hope Booth to Switzerland?” And we’re seeing all of this. And our team is just like, “Whoa, guys, we don’t know how this works.” Like, we just created one by faith because we really believed the vision God gave us, but we weren’t really sure how to move past that alone. And so once we started seeing that we knew, “Okay, this has to be a global movement. And two, we have to get this up and running. This is no longer just a cute idea. We know that this is a God given vision. And it has the ability to impact humanity in a way that we have never seen before.” And so then we went on this mission of raising $40,000 to go on a 30 day, 19 city tour across the country. We figured if we’re going to go all out with this thing, then we might as well get enough beta users to give us all of the data and feedback we need so that we can create this with accuracy. Creating with accuracy is something that is incredibly important on our team. When trying to see others we have to know how others feel about it, and what we can alter and adjust. And so we ended up raising that money, and that was a God story in itself. Every detail of this story is a God’s story in itself. But we ended up going on the tour in March, 30 days, 19 cities across the country. And it was unbelievable. That’s the documentary that you probably would have seen, which is called Until All Are Seen.

Latasha Morrison
19 cities. How in the world did y’all do that?

Gloria Umanah
19 cities. You think you would think we’d done this before.

Latasha Morrison
That’s how I know you’re under 30. I’m like, “My knees! Oh my goodness, my back.” (laughter) I love it.

Gloria Umanah
It was honestly, amazing. One of my favorite things we’ve ever done. I would go back. Like we got the chance to go to college campuses. We got the chance to go to some hospitals. We got the chance to go to some churches, some street corners, just all across the country.

Latasha Morrison
I love it.

Gloria Umanah
And the feedback was just resounding. But there was a common consensus of, “I needed this.” There’s like two tiers of people that would experience the Hope Booth every single day. There was tier number one of those who were in need of hope for the day. And then there was tier number two of those who are in need of hope to live another day. And that right there is so key and so pivotal, because our prayer is that the Hope Booth would become like a catalyst and a monumental moment in people’s stories. And they’ll tell these stories 10 years from now and say, “You know what, I was going to give up. But somehow some day, some telephone booth was just in the middle of the street, and it had the words ‘Need hope, stand here.’ And I’m here today because I stood there.” Like, that’s our heart and our prayer is that God would meet people in these perfect opportune moments where people feel as though they are going to give up or they feel as though they don’t know if they can keep going, where they feel as though there is no hope anymore, when a church is closed and they can’t show up because it’s not a Sunday, when they can’t afford to go to a therapist because it cost too much and they’re overbooked, that there would somehow be a catalyst for people to find hope and connect to the help that they need. And that’s our whole heartbeat and our goal.

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Latasha Morrison
Sometimes people don’t realize that the resources that everyone has, everyone doesn’t have that same resource. And it’s important for us to understand that. And then the stigma in a lot of cultures, you know, it’s different to, you know, like you said, being from Nigerian, you know, community, going to a therapist or really talking about those things or not. It’s like, you kind of you lean in and you just deal with it. And it depends on what culture you come from. You know, I hear about the same thing. I was just having a conversation with Ray Chang last week about the Asian American community, and the shame that comes along with mental illness. And you know, we think about the society that we live in, we live in a highly charged trauma society. And so think about the impact and the effects that it’s having on children. These children that are having to live through gun violence, you know, school shootings, you know, just the scariness of that. I know how it’s impacting me, to the point where when I’m going out, you know what I’m thinking about? I’m watching, I’m more alert. Like my mom, you know, has not been to a movie theater since that shooting in the Batman movie theater because it happened in the movie theater. It’s just really scary. Like secondary trauma from that. And that was years ago.

Gloria Umanah
And that’s fair. That’s fair.

Latasha Morrison
And will not go, she’ll wait until it comes out on TV. You know? So I’m just saying like just the generational trauma and we carry that in our bodies. And so I think that’s important, you know, in a world is filled with so much anxiety and hopelessness and grief and fear that also the second side of that, that there’s also beauty within those ashes. And sometimes we have to be reminded of that. And I see the Hope Booth doing that. That’s why even with Be the Bridge where I feel like, you know, we are so in line with what you’re talking about, we deal with some very hard, complex issues. But also you have to leave people with hope. And it’s like, how do you leave people with hope when you’re talking about things that have gone on for centuries that, you know, we didn’t cause it, but it is our responsibility as believers to be a part of the solution? How do you have that conversation and get people to have empathy, but also to let that collective empathy drive us towards restoration and redemption, which is hopeful. And so, you know, people feeling seen. I’ve been using this in one of my talks. There’s this Swahili word, and I heard this word years ago, but I was doing a talk this winter at a school. And I just for some reason, I just, you know, there were, it was a predominantly white Christian school, and there was a handful of kids of color. And they were all in the Be the Bridge group. And there were just a few, maybe two or three white students that were a part of the Be the Bridge group.

Latasha Morrison
And so this group had to become like this safe and brave space for those students in the midst of everything that they were dealing with in the school. And so I got an opportunity to talk to the students in that school. And I said, “How many of you feel safe here?” You know, and, you know, kids stood up. “How many of you feel like you belong here?” Some of the kids stood up. And some of them, a lot of this, you know, just a mixture of kids, you know, from different ethnicities stood up. But then there were some kids that stayed sitting down. And I said, “Sometimes, you know, we don’t see the people that feel like they don’t belong or they feel invisible or they feel unseen, because we majority of the people here feel like they belong. But then there’s this handful of people that are getting lost in translation. So how do you make them feel seen?” And so just you know, asking that question. And so I remember this Swahili word, and you may know this. And there’s this word, just like really pausing in Swahili when they greet people, there’s this word “Sawubona,” that they use.

Gloria Umanah
My favorite!

Latasha Morrison
You know! Right? And it says, “I am here.” “We are here.” And then in return, the greeting is, “Sikhona.” Which is like saying that, “If I am seen, then I am here.” Your acknowledgement of my presence, I am carrying my history, my ancestors, like every there is hope that I’m carrying with me. And so that acknowledgement is really seeing people. And I love in different cultures, how the greeting is different. And so it’s beyond the just the hello, but it’s saying, “I see you.” And I think this is so important that people need to feel and experience today. And I know you’ve noticed this on your tour. What is something that stood out to you on the tour, like some stories that stood out to you, when you were on the tour?

Gloria Umanah
Yeah, that’s a great question. I think even just to piggyback off of what you just said, the Beauty of seeing others, I feel like extends beyond just the acknowledgement but extends into the appreciation.

Latasha Morrison
Yes.

Gloria Umanah
And so I acknowledge that you’re here, but I also appreciate your existence. And I think that is when we cross over from knowing I am seen to I belong. That’s beautiful right there. There’s just so many powerful stories on the tour. And I think the first one happened in the first day. I remember, we were in Nashville, Tennessee. And our team was setting up for the very first stop, and I’m sitting in the RV. And I’m kind of experiencing mild anxiety. I’m also experiencing like, impostor syndrome. And I’m unsure like, “Is this gonna work? Like did I just like drag a whole team out here for 30 days, for something that’s just like a cool idea?” Because my heart was like, “I want this to be impactful, not just like, cool. Like, I know, this is cool, but I want it to be impactful. I want it to work. I want people’s hearts to shift in a moment.” And I get out of the RV after I pull myself together. And in our prototype version of the Hope Booth, we have like a GoPro insert in the Hope Booth that helps us tell the story from a couple different vantage points, which you’ll see in the documentary. And I had the iPad in my hand, which had the viewing of the GoPro. And this girl was at the Hope Booth and within about 20 seconds, I could see her body shaking. And before I knew it, tears are just flowing down from her eyes as she is watching the experience. And I’m wondering to myself, “What in the world has happened?” And so shortly after we had the opportunity to talk with her. And the most beautiful thing she said was, “It was this day, a year ago, that my mom passed away by suicide. And her name was Hope.” And she said, “This right here was just a reminder that God is with me, and he will drag you out.” And I was just like, “Oh my goodness.” That’s when I knew in that moment, “We are exactly where we’re supposed to be, doing exactly what we’re supposed to be doing. This is no longer a matter of a cool idea. This is not even Gloria’s idea. This is now God’s heart in action. This is now God’s vision in motion.” Like it was just amazing to see that story after story after story was people saying, “This was God meeting me right here. Like this was perfect, opportune moment. Like I don’t know what I would have done if I didn’t have this this moment, this experience, this encounter.” We spoke to this one woman who brought her son to experience the Hope Booth. And his name is Aiden. Aiden is about six years old at the time was the youngest person to ever experience the Hope Booth. And Aiden really wanted to try the Hope Booth. But his mom was like, “I don’t know, like Aiden is ADHD and Autistic so he doesn’t typically like stay still for long. I don’t know if it’s going to be the best bet.” And we said, “Let him just try it. Like maybe this will be different.” And so Aiden walks up to the Hope Booth puts the headphones on. And for the entirety of the three minute experience did not move an inch. I watched his mom, just in the back, say, “This is not normal. Like we’ve never seen our son stand still for this long.” Aiden takes the headphones off. And he says, “Mom, I feel so much peace.” And I just think it’s so beautiful. Because what people don’t know, and what people don’t realize is who that piece is. They think it’s just a serenity. They think it’s just a calmness, but really it is peace of the Holy Spirit. Like that’s our prayer and our heartbeat is that people who experience anxiety and chaos internally, they would walk into the Hope Booth experience and walk out differently. They would walk out feeling a sense of peace that they didn’t experience before. And that was just, I feel like a commonality that we saw throughout the tour people saying, “Man, I felt a peace that I’ve never felt before,” or “This hope you guys are talking about, like, what is it? Because it doesn’t feel like the hope that I have.” And that’s like, our opportunity to share with people more in detail what is this hope that we have and why is it lasting? Why is it eternal? Why does it come with such peace? Why does it come with all of these other beautiful things? And I think it was just, it was just amazing to see this for 30 straight days, every single day it was a different miracle story. And it’s just been, it’s been powerful ever since that moment. And we’ve had more opportunities to now take the Hope Booth around to different areas in different places. And now we’re kind of moving into the permanent installation year, which is this year. We start in August and now we’ve had so much feedback. We’ve had so much opportunity to kind of fine tune and perfect every detail based off of the 4000 plus people who have experienced and been impacted by the Hope Booth now. And so I’m excited to see even just like the final version come about and hear what people have to say when they experience that.

Latasha Morrison
Wow. I love what you said, like, with this Hope Booth, you’re also pointing people to help. And so like they need hope and help. And I love that. How many of these booths do you have? Currently?

Gloria Umanah
Yeah, so currently, we are still in our manufacturing stage.

Latasha Morrison
Okay.

Gloria Umanah
And so kind of our model is people, churches, businesses, organizations can sponsor booths. And then come August is when we begin the installation.

Latasha Morrison
Oh! So people can sponsor booths? Did y’all hear that community?

Gloria Umanah
Correct. It’s the only way it happens.

Latasha Morrison
And then, and then you guys find the location that you put it in? Or can people say, “Hey, I want one of those at my school,” or “I want one of those in my community at the park.” You can choose where you want it?

Gloria Umanah
Yeah, that’s a great question. So it’s both and. So we have a running list of places that we know, like the Lord wants us to have Hope Booth in. For example, you talked about the Batman movie theater shooting in Aurora, Colorado, one of my close friends was shot in that shooting. And so we want to put one there at that theater in honor of her. And so there’s several places that have like experience a collective hopelessness, that we want to have booths in. And then there’s also a whole list of places that we’ve never even thought of that people are like, “Hey, we’d love to have this at my school,” or “We’d love to have this on our street corner.” And kind of just working in tandem with that. It’s kind of how we’ve been moving.

Latasha Morrison
Yeah, I think like even I’m thinking about what just happened on the BeltLine, and different things that’s happened here in Atlanta, like, you know, places where people often go that, you know, you just never know what someone is going through. And them encountering the peace of God, you know, the hope of His glory, like, it’s like, it can change, you know, the trajectory.

Gloria Umanah
It can change so much. I mean, I was reading through Daniel today, and I love it, because there’s a moment where King Nebuchadnezzar says, “When I looked to heaven, immediately, my conscience became clear. Immediately, my soul was lifted.” And I think like, I think sometimes we think this has to be extremely, like, intricate in detail. Like, we have to not forget the fact that the Spirit is already moving, it’s already in motion. Like, if we join him in that work, that means he can meet people quicker, he can meet people in those perfect moments. And so we’re trying to, I think our motto on the team is like, how can we be in the way. That’s what we always say, like, every time we set up the Hope Booth. The goal is let’s be in the way. We don’t want to put it off to a corner, somewhere cute, we need it to be in someone’s way so they cannot miss it; they have to walk straight into it, and say, “This just found me exactly where I was.” That’s, kind of our heartbeat and our goal there.

Latasha Morrison
And so basically, it’s like an old phone booth that you guys take and you kind of like when you go to a museum, it’s like, maybe like a tablet or something that’s in there, that can be pre loaded with stories, and you have the headphones. And I know, we’ve experienced that in some of the museums. And it’s so funny, my friend just took her son, her teenage son to Equal Justice Initiative down in Montgomery. And, you know, she took them to the one of the museum, and she was like, “What was the most impactful thing for you?” And he was like, “The stories.” Like when there’s kind of like this, what you would kind of, it’s like a is the museum is like, it looks like a hologram of someone, but they’re telling their story as if they were living at that time. And so, he experienced that. People are touched by stories.

Gloria Umanah
They are.

Latasha Morrison
That kind of pulls you in. But that was impactful, that made it real for him, that that was the most impactful thing. So I can imagine, you know, hearing stories through the Hope Booth is going to really change the trajectory of someone’s life, you know, that they will not forget that. That young girl who lost her mom to suicide, her mom was named Hope. But the first thing she pointed to was like, how God has a way of pulling you out, you know, and meeting you where you are. That was like your yes allowed this to happen with her. And I think our yeses are so important. I think about, you know, even with suicide, you know, being one of the leading cause among ages 10 to 14, like the hurt and the anxiety that people are feeling like, I know, when I was growing up in school, it was rare to know someone that had encountered suicide. You know know what I’m saying? Or it wasn’t talked about as much. Now, this is very common. We have, you know, people on TV, like, there’s a lot of things that are happening where it’s in your face. And, you know, not only is this the leading death, second leading death among people, but then that means that kids that age know someone, you know, that are committing suicide. And so and I think, you know, when you said the average person living on the streets goes, three to six months without someone looking them in the eyes. And I think, you know, when we say, “I see you,” you know, there’s a way of really showing people their dignity, and their worth, when you acknowledge their existence. So someone had told me that even if you don’t give someone that’s houseless, you know, money or resource, to look at them and smile and to acknowledge their existence is just as important. Because it can be a reminder for them of who God has created them to be. It can be a reminder of someone that they knew that loved them. You don’t know their story and why they’re on the street. You don’t know. We don’t know.

Gloria Umanah
That’s so true. And I think like one of the biggest things that we say often on our team, we have this motto, where we say it’s bigger than the booth. Because our heart one day is that there wouldn’t even need to be a need for a Hope Booth. That it would just be there as a supplement. But we would do the work as humanity to see each other. Like that is our mandate, that is our responsibility. It shouldn’t be left up to a Hope Booth to do that. But because we haven’t been carrying that weight, we have now had to create something to help do that, to help others see the importance of that. But when we talk about pioneering a movement, things don’t pioneer movements, people do. So it means us coming together collectively to fight to see others, despite the difficulty of seeing others sometimes. It’s very inconvenient at times. But eventually we have to choose people over convenience at some point. Because one of my friends has this saying where she says, “It shouldn’t have to happen to you to matter to you.” And I think the reality is where we are in our world right now we’re very self centered. And if we are not directly affected by something, we don’t care, we’re not moved to action. And my hope and prayer is that it wouldn’t be someone in our close knit families who would lose their life to suicide before we begin to realize the importance of seeing others, before we begin to realize the importance of helping people get the help that they need, before we begin to realize that hope is essential and vital for every single person to experience and encounter. And I remember in high school, it was during the year that I was experiencing suicidal ideation. It was October 29, 2011. That was the day that I planned to take my own life. And I remember packing with me in a Ziploc bag, everything I was going to use to do so. And I went to this DNow because my mom told me I had to go. And my mom’s African and I can’t say no. So I remember her showing up. And I prayed a simple prayer in the midst of the worship. I didn’t have a lot of faith, but I had enough to pray this prayer. And I said, “God, if you are real, would you encounter me?” Because I deeply wanted to feel seen, I deeply wanted to know that my existence would matter. My existence here on this Earth holds value. And I pray that prayer not thinking much of it. And as time went by, throughout worship, nothing happened. And so I remember walking up to the exit, put my hand on the door just about to open it and leave. And the person who was preaching stopped his message and he said, “There’s someone in this room who’s getting ready to take their life right now. God wants to encounter you.” And I remember thinking to myself, “There’s no way. There’s absolutely no way that this is happening right now.” And then immediately the lies came to my mind, “People are going to think you’re crazy. You’re a pastor’s kid. You can’t possibly be struggling with this. They’re gonna say more things.” And the person that was on stage preaching said, “I know right now the enemy is whispering to you that people are going to call you crazy. This is your moment of encounter. Don’t miss it.” And in that moment, he said, “Count of three, everyone who is struggling with this right now, I want you to raise your hand if that’s you.” And as he’s counting down, I’m sweating bullets. I’m like, “I can’t, I can’t, I can’t like, I can’t do this, this is too hard. “And he gets to three, and I open my eyes. And I see that there’s about 20 other hands in the air, that it wasn’t just me. And in that moment, like when I internalized you are not alone. I think we hear this. But to see it was something special. To see it was like evidence and proof that regardless of what we go through, and regardless of what we’re experiencing, there really are other people who are struggling in the same way. And I think from that moment, I began to realize, like I didn’t share my story for years. I didn’t tell anyone for years, up until maybe like 2018, when I began to realize like, my scars are roadmaps to redemption for other people.

Latasha Morrison
Amen.

Gloria Umanah
Like today, because I’m telling my story, there are people who are choosing life. Like I believe there are people who will listen to this podcast and choose to live another day, because I’ve shared my story. And I think, I mean, we see this in Scripture, there is power in our testimony and the blood of the lamb. Like there is power in sharing your story. There is strength in your story, even when it feels like it’s not complete yet. Our story is not ever going to be complete until we reach glory. So you might as well get comfortable sharing it now. And knowing that like, God is still healing you. But I think as we show our scars, we’re able to show people that their wounds can heal. It’s possible. This is not something we just talked about. It’s not cute words that we just packaged together just to encourage you for the sake of it. But like I’m living proof that you will heal. I’m living proof that you will make it through. And I think people sharing their stories is big. People sharing where they’ve come from is huge and important. And sometimes it can be filled with shame in the first few times that you do it, because it’s hard and it’s difficult. But scientifically, it’s actually proven that when you share your story, the person who’s listening and you begin to feel a sense of freedom. And that is powerful right there. So my hope and prayer is that people will begin to grow confident in sharing those stories of hope.

Latasha Morrison
Yeah, so good. That’s beautiful. I mean, you know, having been in youth ministry for so long, you know, the weight of the world at the age of, you know, 15 and 14, 16. It’s like we have to teach our youth to be able to be steadfast in the midst of pain. You know? And I think that’s something that, you know, those of you who are listening, you know, the things that, you know, we want to teach our kids to make sure that they are acknowledging the dignity in every person, no matter what background they come from. Teaching your kids to love the other. That’s something that if you could have had that experience too growing up. The other thing is, you know, as we teach our kids is we have to, like, teach our kids to understand and to endure pain and suffering. There’s this scripture in First Peter, that’s really been on my heart, I think I posted it today. But just in verse 10. And First Peter five, it says, “And the God of all grace, who called you to His eternal glory in Christ, after you have suffered a little while will himself restore you.” So the restoration part. “He will make you strong and firm and steadfast.” And so that’s, you know, and I’m praying that even how God would use the Hope Booth as like you said, as a catalyst, as a conduit into that restoration, and to make him people strong, and to help him people be firm and steadfast, not wavering. And I think just at times, that was one of the things that the Lord spoke to me and at this time, it was like 2016 the weight of the world was so much, this is hard work. I’m like, “I don’t, why’d you choose me to do this? Why can’t I just like…I just want to talk about joy. And let me just like, let me be like a Christian comedian or something. I gotta do the hard thing.”

Gloria Umanah
The hard stuff.

Latasha Morrison
From working, you know, in this work with human trafficking to this. I’m like, these are some deep, hard things for someone that I feel like exudes a lot of joy. So been wrestling with that with the Lord. And I just remember hearing this Civil Rights leader talk, and he just had this peace over him. And it was just at that moment that he said that, you know, “We had to be steadfast in this.” And I was like, “Lord, I need that.” Like if I’m going to be doing this, like, I have to understand what it means to be firm and steadfast, planted in your word.

Gloria Umanah
That’s it right there.

Latasha Morrison
And so, you know, there’s a lot, this is a lot of heavy lifting that we’re doing. How are you taking care of yourself, Gloria? How are you taking care of Gloria?

Gloria Umanah
That’s a great question.

Latasha Morrison
And then we’re gonna get ready to close in a minute. But you know, because I know, as a young woman, as a young, Black woman, we can put, you know, like, it’s this thing where it’s like, “Oh, you’re strong. You can endure.” Like, you know, all these things. But there are moments we have, we are weak too. You know, we are vulnerable. You know, sometimes we can put others before ourselves, or we can put the oxygen mask on everyone else and not have it on ourselves. How are you taking care of yourself as you’re leading this lifestyle?

Gloria Umanah
That’s a great question. So my anchor scripture is First Corinthians 15:58, “Be steadfast, immmovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, knowing that in the Lord, your labor is not in vain.” And the reason why is because I think there is that key element of in the Lord, your labor is not in vain. When I’m not taking care of myself, I’m operating in my own strength, and my work is no longer in the Lord. Therefore, my work probably will be in vain. And I probably will suffer my typical migraines, I’ll probably suffer some anxious episodes that I could honestly bypass if I just submit under the Lord. And so for me what that looks like, I’m a very like, I love soft girl life. I’m not even gonna lie. I love stuff girl life in every possible way. So I have to be very intentional about choosing it and knowing it’s not selfish. But I intentionally go get massages because I carry a lot of my stress in my neck and my shoulders. And naturally, I just love to carry the weight of the world, it seems like. And so I have to get massages pretty often. When I wake up in the morning, I’ve learned if I look at my phone first, it’s going to be a bad day. Like, I’ve tried to trick myself and tell myself, “No, it’s not,” it’s gonna be a bad day, Gloria, I put that phone away. So now I don’t sleep with my phone charging in my room, I actually sleep with it pretty far out. And I set my alarm on like a physical clock. So I don’t Have to be forced to look at my phone right away. And I spend the morning taking deep breaths. I think I, growing up didn’t realize how important breathing was until I suffered several anxiety attacks. And my mom would always tell me, “Gloria, you have to breathe.” So now I do this really beautiful thing that’s used in like ancient Christianity, where it’s really just called breath prayer, where you breathe in the name of God, any name that you feel is accurate in the moment. And then you breathe out that desire. So sometimes that could look like, “Abba, help me to trust you.” And I do that for about 10 minutes. And it is very calming, very soothing, helps me center myself in knowing that God really is going to take care of me. And I don’t have to carry the weight on my shoulders. And so those are some practical things that I do. I realized, like if I’m going to be leading a fast paced organization that’s helping people with their mental health, mine cannot be crashing, that will not make any sense. That sounds like gaining the world and losing your soul. And so I have to be very practical and tangible and very rigid and disciplined in like taking care of myself. Otherwise, I’ll just naturally like, I’m good at just forgetting stuff like that. And then it catches up with me and I try to figure out why am I so flustered. Why am I so angry? Why am I not being kind? Well, it’s because I’m stressed. I’m tense. I’m anxious. And that doesn’t serve anybody well. And so choosing to take care of me, I feel like it’s a form of activism in a sense. It’s a deliberate choice to choose that I matter as much as the work that I’m doing as well.

Latasha Morrison
Yeah, I typically ask people, like, you know, what, you know, what are some of the things that they’re lamenting, but we kind of talked about that. And then I also ask people, you know, what are the things that’s bringing you hope, you know, in this moment. But we just talked about the Hope Booth and so many other things.

Gloria Umanah
We did it all.

Latasha Morrison
And so, I want to end a little different. And so I don’t know if you’re gonna follow me here. Now. You are a spoken word artist. Amongst everything, I think you preach and everything. And there is this spoken word piece that you have that I think is just really poignant for this moment as we get ready to close. So we’re going to put all the information about what Gloria is doing in the show notes, there’s going to be ways that you can support her work of bringing hope to the world, through her Hope Booths. I know that this is not going to be the last time she and I are going to meet and talk about this being that we’re both in Atlanta. And I have like, probably a gazillion, which is not a number, but I have that in my head right now of ideas of just ways that we can partner that I think would be incredible. But there’s this spoken word piece called “See Me” that you do. Is there a way just to do a little taste of that? I know you see, I do this to people. I didn’t prepare. And listen, this is why I say, I let people know, “Hey, we’re just gonna talk, we’re just gonna share.” And, you know, because I don’t want everything to be manufactured. But then I just like to allow the Lord to lead. And just if you could just do a little bit, just to leave the Be the Bridge audience with this, I believe this is like a lament and a hope at the same time. Because lament leads us toward hope. And there’s power and transformation in lamenting. So if you could just maybe do just a little bit.

Gloria Umanah
Okay. I don’t mind. I just don’t have it memorized. So I have to pull it up.

Latasha Morrison
Oh that’s fine. That’s fine. Okay. But I think you know, I think it’s just something that’s a little bit, it’s actually you have it on, I think it’s on YouTube also.

Gloria Umanah
Yeah, the video is there.

Latasha Morrison
But you see, they record so many things that I can imagine. First of all, I don’t understand how artists memorize the things that they memorize. Like I have, even as I get older, I’m like, “Oh, I’m gonna need to have to start taking some prevagen or something.” (laughter)

Gloria Umanah
Actually, no, actually. I mean, I feel like I used to memorize a good bit, but then I decided I’m tired of memorizing. This is, “You guys need to just have a teleprompter. I can’t do this anymore.”

Latasha Morrison
Right, right. I use a teleprompter now, because if not, it helps keep me succict when I’m talking. And, you know, just even especially if I have to remember a lot of little details. Now sometimes if I’m just sharing from my heart, that’s one thing. But then if you want me to repeat that, it’s going to be a different heart. (laughter)

Gloria Umanah
Listen. Yes, it’s true.

Latasha Morrison
There’s nothing wrong with a teleprompter to help, you know, in memorization and all of those things. Because I will go off into a tangent really quickly, and make up some other things.

Gloria Umanah
Make up words.

Latasha Morrison
When I teach, I have to have a script. You know, I’m trying to work my way out of not having so much of a script, but it just keeps me laser focus. Especially someone like me that can be you know, somewhat ADD, I can like, venture off. I’ll get off real quick and don’t know how to get back on.

Gloria Umanah
Yeah. I can see that. I can totally do that. Well, I have the script here. I mean, I guess you want me to just do the whole thing or?

Latasha Morrison
You know what? I want you to close out with it. Let’s go for it. Wherever you feel like, if you feel like doing the whole thing or if you feel like stopping at a certain point.

Gloria Umanah
It’s a full story. Okay. All right, perfect. Well, here is a spoken word that I wrote a couple years ago called See Me.

Gloria Umanah
I remember standing in the background of a crowded room after sharing my story at a woman’s conference. And it’ll never escape me. How we locked eyes from a distance as though familiar had been found. It was all we could do. As the deafening roar of hundreds of voices in the room plummeted over the edge of every sound bite. She began to walk towards me with an urgency in her hesitant stride. I thought there had been something contained in that brief glance, but couldn’t be sure. She looked like a heavyweight champion. The way she carried those bags underneath her eyes like trophies. I could tell. She had been through wars unknown and still somehow made it out alive, bruised and battered. I couldn’t have prepared myself for what was to come next. It was as if time froze in a capsule begging for reconciliation. And there I stood, heavy. As she heaved her sorrow, arms anchored around me like a buoy of belief in the wake of hopelessness, a stream of pain drifting from her eyes as she whimpered words I could never forget. Even if I tried. 30 years, my husband of 30 years has left she said. And before I can even must hurt a failed attempt to dig through the wreckage layered on her shoulders, and mosaic her shattered pieces from weary lungs she unleashed, but your words of the staying power of a true lover has kept me. Here, alive, and with hope that holds me. When I thought I was at the end of my rope, you saw me. You saw me. And you would think. You would think it was almost as if I called her by name from that stage. Every analogy and synonym I spoke she recollected and felt in her veins. It was living water to her comatose soul. It was the very encounter that resuscitated her bone. See, these are not coincidental moments. These are Elijah moments. These are Esther moments. These are Emanuel moments. The practical and the prophetic, the hope and the healing. Where defeat meets God’s divine through the passage of you and I to see the one with riddles of her mind left unsolved, to see the one whose heartbeat beckons to discover a roadmap to redemption. She’s tried to rebuild. She longs to restore. But the unbelief thickens, and muzzles her pulse. We have no strength to brush away the remnants of her ashes, no will to unveil her destruction because no scheme, no plan, no manmade attempt can keep her heart from shattering. But I knew the one who could, the one who makes sanctuaries out of shattered pieces. And it’ll never escape me. How we locked eyes from a distance as though familiar had been found. It was his power within me that she was searching for. And it was his power within me, that she finally found. I could see the justice of restoration, tangible in the form of tears. As she wiped her eyes of the misery and fixated them towards the Messiah. The God who sees once again. And in all of its weight and glory, He made me to be a carrier of her Kairos, a messenger of her miraculous moments, a voice in her wilderness.

Latasha Morrison
Be the Bridge community, that is Gloria Umanah, and I am so happy to meet you. And I’m so grateful that our community knows about Hope Booth. And thank you so much for seeing us, for pausing to see other people. And so I hope that this podcast will be helpful to someone. That if you’re not feeling seen, that you would feel the power of the words that were just spoken, and that you would feel the power of the word that I talked about, Sawubona. That you are here. That you are seen. That you are known. That you belong. So that is my prayer for you as you listen to this podcast today. So thank you for joining us, Gloria. We will have all this information in the show notes. And I look forward to getting to know you a little bit better.

Gloria Umanah
Thank you so much. Thank you. I’m honored to be here.

Narrator
Thanks for listening to the Be the Bridge Podcast. To find out more about the Be the Bridge organization and or to become a bridge builder in your community, go to BeTheBridge.com. Again, that’s BeTheBridge.com. If you’ve enjoyed this podcast, remember to rate and review it on this platform and share it with as many people as you possibly can. You can also connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Today’s show was edited, recorded, and produced by Travon Potts at Integrated Entertainment Studios in Metro Atlanta, Georgia. The host and executive producer is Latasha Morrison. Lauren C. Brown is the Senior Producer. And transcribed by Sarah Connatser. Please join us next time. This has been at Be the Bridge production.